Application Tutorial

This tutorial will show you how to create an application and use some of the functionalities.

Creation

To create a new application package, run the following command inside your OS.js installation: npm run make:application.

The created application will be placed in src/packages (by default) and is based on the official example.

For general information about development see development article.

Remember to run npm run package:discover after you generate a package to make it available.

Metadata

The metadata.json file describes your application and contains a list of files that is required to load on application launch or on boot.

[info] Remember to run npm run package:discover after you change your metadata.

{
  "type": "application",

  // The unique name
  "name": "MyApplication",

  // What category this application belongs to (defaults ot "other"):
  // development, science, games, graphics, network, multimedia, office, system, utilities and other
  "category": null,

  // Automatically start on boot
  "autostart": false,

  // Only allow one instance of this application
  "singleton": false,

  // Hide from launch menus, etc.
  // Useful in combination with autostart and/or singleton
  "hidden": false,

  // A filename to icon
  "icon": null,

  // The server script to load (if any)
  "server": "server.js",

  // Lock down to users with given groups
  "groups": [],

  // User needs to belong to all groups defined (default)
  "strictGroups": true,

  // A map of localized titles
  "title": {
    "en_EN": "My Application"
  },

  // A map of localized descriptions
  "description": {
    "en_EN": "My Application"
  },

  // A list of supported MIME types
  // Either a regular expression or full-match string
  "mimes": [
    "^image\/(.*)",
    "^video\/(.*)"
  ],

  // Load these files (usually generated with Webpack)
  "files": [
    // Load files on application launch
    "main.js",
    "main.css",
    // Equivalent to passing simple string "/path/to/file.js"
    {"filename": "/path/to/file.js", "type": "preload"},
    // Load file on boot
    {"filename": "/path/to/file.js", "type": "background"}
  ]
}

npm

Please note that your package.json file that your application is published with contains this section for the package discovery to work:

{
  "osjs": {
    "type": "package"
  }
}

Basic Example

Typically index.js:

import osjs from 'osjs'; // Webpack external. Same as 'window.OSjs'
import {name as applicationName} from './metadata.json';

osjs.register(applicationName, (core, args, options, metadata) => {
  const proc = core.make('osjs/application', {args, options, metadata});

  // Create your windows etc here

  return proc;
});

And server.js for the server:

module.exports = (core, proc) => ({
  async init() {
    // Register your routes etc here
  },

  async start() {
    // Any arbitrary stuff here
  },

  destroy() {
    // Stop your stuff when server goes down
  }
});

Windows

To create a new Window instance:

const win = proc.createWindow({title: 'My Window'})

If you want to close your application when the window is destructed:

win.on('destroy', () => proc.destroy());

Events

You can listen on events with:

proc.on('event-name', (...args) => console.log(...args));
  • destroy => () - When destroyed
  • create-window => (win, proc) - When window is created
  • destroy-window => (win, proc) - When window is destroyed
  • attention => (args, options) - Signal when a new instance of a singleton application is launched

To broadcast events to all running applications you can use:

core.broadcast('ApplicationName', 'event-name', 1, 2, 3)
proc.on('event-name', (...args) => console.log(...args)); // => 1, 2, 3

Singleton applications will receive the attention event when another instance is dropped from launching.

For internal events, see Core Tutorial

Resources

You can get an URL to any resource bundled with your application using the resource method:

[info] Application resources are resolved as /apps/{name}/{resource}

const url = proc.resource('/image.png');

Or via webpack with:

[info] This requires you to use file-loader in your webpack configuration.

import resource from './resource.ext';

HTTP Requests

You can set up your own HTTP routes using the internal APIs:

[info] Application endpoints are resolved as /apps/{name}/{endpoint}

Client

Create the endpoint URL, then use the request() method (a wrapper around fetch()):

const response = await proc.request('/hello-world', {method: 'post'});
console.log(response);

Server

In your server script, create a matching endpoint with Express:

[info] You can access POST body data via req.body and GET parameters via req.query.

const {routeAuthenticated} = core.make('osjs/express');
const endpoint = proc.resource('/hello-world');

routeAuthenticated('POST', endpoint, (req, res) => {
  res.json({result: 'Hello World'});
});

WebSockets

You can use WebSockets in a couple of different ways.

Core Socket Connection

The easiest way to use Websockets is to use the core Websocket connection.

This will not create a new connection, but rather use the main client Websocket connection as a proxy, which comes with some limitations, but is great for adding basic interactions.

Client

In your application script:

proc.on('ws:message', params => console.log(params)); // => ['Pong']
proc.send('Ping');

Server

In your server script, use the onmessage method:

module.exports = (core, proc) => ({
  onmessage: (ws, respond, params) => {
    if (params[0] === 'Ping') {
      respond('Pong');
    }
  }
});

Custom Socket Connection

You can also create new WebSocket connections.

[info] Application endpoints are resolved as /apps/{name}/{endpoint}

Client

Create an instance of Websocket with socket(), which is just a wrapper around regular WebSocket instance with on/off/emit for handing events:

Note that sockets automatically closes when application is destroyed.

const ws = proc.socket(); // Defaults to '/socket' (first argument)

ws.on('message', ev => console.log('got data', ev.data));
ws.on('close', () => console.log('closed'));
ws.on('error', ev => console.log('error', err));
ws.send('data'); // Sends data
ws.close(); // Closes socket

Server

In your server script, create a matching endpoint with Express:

[info] You can get the core Websocket server via core.wss. You can add properties to the ws object in the app.ws() method filter out the list of clients from wss.clients.

const endpoint = proc.resource('/socket');
core.app.ws(endpoint, (ws, req) => {
  ws.on('message', msg => console.log(msg)); // Message
  ws.on('close', () => console.log('closed')); // Closed
  ws.send('data'); // Sends data
  ws.close(); // Cloese socket
});

Settings

Applications also supports settings storage:

// Set default settings
import osjs from 'osjs'; // Webpack external. Same as 'window.OSjs'
import {name as applicationName} from './metadata.json';

osjs.register(applicationName, (core, args, options, metadata) => {
  options.settings = {
    foo: 'Default setting'
  };

  // Gets a setting
  console.log(proc.settings.foo)

  // Sets a setting.
  proc.settings.foo = 'Custom setting';
  proc.saveSettings() // Save settings -> Promise
});

Launch Arguments

When an application is launched, it might contain arguments:

[info] If your application was launched with a file associated to an assigned MIME, the file property will be added automatically to the args object.

// Launch application with arguments
core.run('MyApplication', {
  foo: 'My custom argument'
});

Retrieve arguments in application:

import osjs from 'osjs'; // Webpack external. Same as 'window.OSjs'
import {name as applicationName} from './metadata.json';

osjs.register(applicationName, (core, args, options, metadata) => {
  const proc = core.make('osjs/application', {args, options, metadata});

  console.log(proc.args); // 'foo' will be set

  return proc;
});

Session

The args property (see above) is stored in the session, so you can use this to save your application state whenever the user logs out:

import osjs from 'osjs'; // Webpack external. Same as 'window.OSjs'
import {name as applicationName} from './metadata.json';

osjs.register(applicationName, (core, args, options, metadata) => {
  const proc = core.make('osjs/application', {args, options, metadata});

  // Arguments launched with your application, including session:
  console.log(proc.args.session); // Only set if the application was saved and restored

  // Sets an argument that will be loaded on restore.
  proc.args.session = 'hello session!';

  return proc;
});

Session storage

Sessions are normally only saved when a user logs out, but you can force this action:

core.make('osjs/session').save(); // Promise
OS.js Web Desktop - © Anders Evenrud <andersevenrud@gmail.com>

results matching ""

    No results matching ""